Structure v. Agency and Aboriginal People

One of the core questions raised in sociology is are we determined by society or do we determine society?  Comedian Tom Ballard interviewed journalist Stan Grant on his podcast Like I’m A Six-Year-Old.  In the second half of this episode (122) arguments of structure and agency arise around Aboriginal people’s rights and treatment in Australia.  Within the interview the two also discuss assimilation, defining a nation’s history, and the role of media in politics.

like i'm aimage from Tom Ballard’s website

The episode can be found at the above link or here: 122 – Stan Grant (Live At Yack Festival) Pt. 1

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The Gender Unicorn

“The Gender Unicorn” is a visual depiction that clarifies and distinguishes various aspects of individuals’ gender and sexual identity.  Its predecessor “The Genderbread Person” is considered by some to be inaccurate and possibly plagiarized.  

gender unicorn.jpgimage from http://www.transstudent.org

Norms: Ikea in Different Cultures

The Ikea chain of stores is a “world-wide wonder” with locations in 49 different countries.  Marketing, and more specifically the annual catalogue, are adapted to their respective countries.  Quartz has an interesting article about some of these variations and resulting controversiespussy riot ikeaImage from The Moscow Times

Whitewashing in Movies

Whitewashing in film is when either 1) white actors play characters of color and pretend to be of the character’s racial / ethnic heritage or 2) the story itself is changed and characters of color are made white.  This has long been a problem, but has reignited recently with casting of films such as Aloha, Ghost in the Shell, and Doctor Strange.

In the case of the film Hell Boy, actor Ed Skrein decided to back out of his portrayal of Major Ben Daimio.  He released the following on twitter concerning his decision:

ed.jpg

Casting characters of color with actors of color can also be contentious.  In the case of The Hunger Games, the casting of Amandla Stenberg and Lenny Kravitz, casted as Rue and Cinna respectively, resulted in a racist twitter backlash.  Readers of the book assumed these characters were white, despite descriptions to the contrary.  Similarly, the casting of black actress Noma Dumezweni as adult Hermione in the Harry Potter play was met with racist reactions.

Some Pre 1980 Songs Referencing LGBTQ

A not – exhaustive list of some songs before 1980 that reference LGBTQ people and issues. (*Needless to say, these should all be contextualized for their relative milieu.  Some are direct in their topic, others oblique.  These are not necessarily advocacy or activist related songs and can contain tokenizing and stereotypical characterizations.)

Gene Malin – “I’d Rather Be Spanish than Manish,” 1932

Troy Walker – “Happiness is Just a Thing Called Joe,” 1962

Van Morrison – “Madame George,” 1968

Lou Reed – “Candy Says,” 1969 

The Kinks – “Lola,” 1970

Madeline Davis – “Stonewall Nation,” 1971

David Bowie – “John, I’m Only Dancing,” 1972

Jobriath – “I’m A Man,” 1973

Chris Robinson – “Looking for a Boy Tonight,” 1973

The Miracles – “Ain’t Nobody Straight in LA,” 1975

Valentino – “I Was Born This Way,” 1975

Rod Stewart – “The Killing of Georgie,” 1976

Sylvester – “You Make Me Feel Mighty Real,” 1978

The Village People – “YMCA,” 1978

Tom Robinson – “Glad To Be Gay,” 1978

Bonus spoken word:

Rae Bourbon – “Let Me Tell You About My Operation,” 1956

Perfume Genius’s “Die 4 You”

In the androgynous / queer music video for “Die 4 You,” Perfume Genius uses erotic asphyxiation as a symbol of commitment and devotion.

Lyrics from genius.com:

Limit every second left
Until I’m off balance

Oh love
I’m there in spirit

Each and every breath I spend
You are collecting

Oh love
See it through
I would die 4 you

Each and every breath I spend
You are collecting
Limit every second left
‘Til I’m off balance
Each and every breath I spend

Oh my love, oh my love
Take your time
Oh my love, take your time
Oh my love, oh my love

Oh my love, oh my love
Take your time
Oh my love, take your time
See it through

Ancestry and Social Construction of Race

Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr., Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard and host of PBS program Finding Your Roots, discussed ancestry and the social construction of race with Trevor Noah on The Daily Show.  The clip can be seen here.
Finding Your Roots has courted controversy in the past for acquiescing to celebrity Ben Affleck’s request to exclude information about his slave owning ancestors.  The program also garnered attention for research into actor / musician Fred Armisen’s past, whereby they discovered that his ethnic heritage is Korean and not Japanese as he believed.