activism

Reclaiming Through Tattoos

One common reason cited for getting a tattoo is to reclaim the (physical) body.  It might be a general reclaiming, or focus on a particular part of the body.  These tattoos can represent individual agency or control over the tattooed person’s “body narrative,” but also connect them to larger communities.  Examples include the use of tattoos relating to marks of self harm, previous addictions, sexual assault, surgery and cancer, trafficking and surviving war.  Specifically, these forms of tattoo are popular amongst women and LGBTQ people.

tattooimage from The Daily Mail

 

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The Word ‘Queer’

The Allusionist, a podcast about language made by Helen Zaltzman, has a new episode about the word ‘queer,’ the complexity of its history and current use.  A79+logo+Queerimage from The Allusionist

Gender Identity

We commonly differentiate ‘sex’ as biological identity, from ‘gender,’ which is the cultural, social, and psychological differences between males and females.  Gender then refers to the patterns we associate with men and women in a cultural context.  The relationship between sex and gender often seen as direct or compulsory, but is socially constructed.  As I’ve previously posted, the Gender Unicorn illustrates the difference between gender identity, gender expression, sex assigned at birth, physical attraction, and emotional attraction. 

Some other cultures have historically included gender identities outside of the male / female binary.  This recognition of identity does not necessarily mean that they do not face discrimination

Recently, Germany has recognized a third gender for intersex people.  As I’ve previously posted, intersex people “do not fit the typical definition of male or female… biological characteristics.”  Theorist Judith Butler argues gender is performative in that it “produces a series of effects” that “consolidate an impression of being a man or being a woman.”  We are not born as men and women, but that it is in social interaction that gender identities are reproduced.

Other terms that have entered the general vernacular around gender include ‘cisgender’ and ‘transgender’ people.  Cisgender people are those whose sex assigned at birth does correspond with their gender identity.  Transgender people are those whose sex assigned at birth does not correspond with their gender identity.  Because transgender people encounter intolerance and violence, gender performance can be complex.

It is becoming more common for young people to identify as gender ‘non binary,’ meaning they do not identify as male or female, or ‘non conforming,’ meaning their gender expression does not correspond with the cultural expectations of their respective gender.  A study recently found that 27% of teenagers in California are gender nonconforming.  In Oregon and California, residents can legally identify as non binary on drivers licenses and state documents.  In 2017, a baby in Canada became the first to have the gender status of ‘unassigned’ or ‘undetermined’ on their health records.  Some celebrities, such as musician Sam Smith and actress Amandla Stenberg, have also come out as gender non binary.    

Americans, Guns, and Relative Deviance

I previously posted a reference to campus gun policies in relation to relative deviance and sex.  Relative deviance is when behavior is defined as deviant in a cultural context.  Restated, how we define deviance is dependent upon both when/time and where/culture.  With the recent school shooting in Florida, activists are mobilizing around changing gun laws.  Various sources are making cultural comparisons to point to the duality of Americans’ views on guns.

Transgender people’s rights:

feminist news trans guns

image from Feminist News

 

Sanitary and sexual products, in an ad campaign from EVOLVE:

images from Upworthy

 

Abortions:

abortions.jpg

image from Feminist News

 

Humanitarian crisis around disease:

video from Sunday with Lubach, a comedy news parody television show in the Netherlands.

 

Prisons:

fla today and fort myers news press image from Cagle by cartoonist Jeff Parker for Florida Today and Fort Myers News-Press

 

And with campus issues specifically, such as lab safety:

lab safety.jpg image from MadBiologist on reddit

Some Pre 1980 Songs Referencing LGBTQ

A not – exhaustive list of some songs before 1980 that reference LGBTQ people and issues. (*Needless to say, these should all be contextualized for their relative milieu.  Some are direct in their topic, others oblique.  These are not necessarily advocacy or activist related songs and can contain tokenizing and stereotypical characterizations.)

Gene Malin – “I’d Rather Be Spanish than Manish,” 1932

Troy Walker – “Happiness is Just a Thing Called Joe,” 1962

Van Morrison – “Madame George,” 1968

Lou Reed – “Candy Says,” 1969 

The Kinks – “Lola,” 1970

Madeline Davis – “Stonewall Nation,” 1971

David Bowie – “John, I’m Only Dancing,” 1972

Jobriath – “I’m A Man,” 1973

Chris Robinson – “Looking for a Boy Tonight,” 1973

The Miracles – “Ain’t Nobody Straight in LA,” 1975

Valentino – “I Was Born This Way,” 1975

Rod Stewart – “The Killing of Georgie,” 1976

Sylvester – “You Make Me Feel Mighty Real,” 1978

The Village People – “YMCA,” 1978

Tom Robinson – “Glad To Be Gay,” 1978

Bonus spoken word:

Rae Bourbon – “Let Me Tell You About My Operation,” 1956

Rise Like a Pheonix

In 2014 the Eurovision Song Contest was won by Conchita Wurst from Austria.  Conchita Wurst is the drag persona of Tom Neuwirth.  “Conchita” is Spanish slang for vulva / vagina and “Wurst” is German slang for penis.

The Eurovision Contest is known for its eccentricity and gay representations are not new, but Wurst’s performance was particularly unique.  Though wearing long, curled hair, full makeup, and a beautiful gown all culturally signifying female, she also had a full beard, a secondary sex characteristic associated with males.

The song “Rise Like a Phoenix” holds additional meaning when sung by Wurst.  The lyrics “Peering from the mirror  No, that isn’t me  Stranger getting nearer  Who can this person be  You wouldn’t know me at all today” and “Once I’m transformed  Once I’m reborn I rise up to the sky  You threw me down but I’m gonna fly  And rise like a phoenix” can all be read as referencing gender ambiguity or transformation.  Neuwirth has stated “Conchita Wurst” is his drag persona and he does not identify as transgender, though, like many drag queens, uses ‘she’ pronouns when in character.  Wurst’s genderqueer performance was attacked by the Russian Orthodox church as an “abomination” and Vladimir Putin as “aggressive” because non traditional gender identity was “put…up for show”.

In her acceptance speech, Wurst stated “This night is dedicated to everyone who believes in a future of peace and freedom.  You know who you are.  We are unity and we are unstoppable.”

Stop and Frisk

A visually beautiful summary of Broken Windows policing with art by Molly Crabapple.

Jessica Williams points out the classism and racism innate to Stop and Frisk policies.

And the story and video from The Nation eluded to in the Broken Windows video.