Americans, Guns, and Relative Deviance

I previously posted a reference to campus gun policies in relation to relative deviance and sex.  Relative deviance is when behavior is defined as deviant in a cultural context.  Restated, how we define deviance is dependent upon both when/time and where/culture.  With the recent school shooting in Florida, activists are mobilizing around changing gun laws.  Various sources are making cultural comparisons to point to the duality of Americans’ views on guns.

Transgender people’s rights:

feminist news trans guns

image from Feminist News


Sanitary and sexual products, in an ad campaign from EVOLVE:

images from Upworthy




image from Feminist News


Humanitarian crisis around disease:

video from Sunday with Lubach, a comedy news parody television show in the Netherlands.



fla today and fort myers news press image from Cagle by cartoonist Jeff Parker for Florida Today and Fort Myers News-Press


And with campus issues specifically, such as lab safety:

lab safety.jpg image from MadBiologist on reddit


Norms: Ikea in Different Cultures

The Ikea chain of stores is a “world-wide wonder” with locations in 49 different countries.  Marketing, and more specifically the annual catalogue, are adapted to their respective countries.  Quartz has an interesting article about some of these variations and resulting controversiespussy riot ikeaImage from The Moscow Times

Pink Politics

In the 2016, the Trump campaign accused Hillary Clinton of lacking “stamina,” being “nasty,not looking presidential, and stated that she was unable to “satisfy” her husband, and therefore would be unable to “satisfy” America.  Though an increasing number of Americans might say they are open to voting for a female president, it is inarguable that some of the anti Clinton rhetoric was rooted in sexism.

Last Week Tonight covered the UK Labour Party’s similarly sexist tropes relied upon in 2015.  Labour defended the pink minibus campaign and continue to be critiqued for sexism from within the party.

Commercial Activism

A Pepsi ad featuring Kendall Jenner recently made it into the news:

The ad was widely met with derision.

This is not a new phenomena.  Imagery and ideas of rebellion have been used to sell products for decades.  Sites such as Jezebel, Sociological Images, and this blog have previously looked at this issue.  Following are some additional examples:

Black Women’s Hair

Our Eurocentric society has a strong bias against black women’s natural hair.  For black women in particular, hair can be tied to a sense of self.  Whether or not to wear hair natural is heavily politicized.  Only recently did the US Army loosen hair restrictions to include braids and twists.  It is unclear as to whether or not an employer can legally discriminate against natural hair.  Currently, some companies cite vague terminology in dress codes such as ‘professional’ or ‘clean cut.’

thesocietypages  image from The Society Pages

White women are particularly terrible on the issue of black women’s hair.  Not only do white women judge black women’s hair as less professional and attractive, but we have simultaneously culturally appropriated black women’s hair styles, such as re labeling cornrows ‘boxing braids’.  Recently, white women have even been featured in advertisements for natural hair products historically marketed towards black women, resulting in an online backlash and apology from at least one company.

black hair whiteimage from The Independent

Ethnographer Dr. Yaba Blay speaks more about the issue in Color Complex: Untangling Black Women’s Hair discussing politics around black hair.

Race on Kinder bars

The article “German Pegida row over non-white photos on Kinder bars” explores reactions to the change in Kinder chocolate packaging.  Some white people were infuriated, saying this was a case of political correctness gone amuck.  It had to be pointed out that the new young men represented on the chocolates were, in fact, Germany’s football team as children.  The article does not address how white people like to use people of color’s bodies for sports, music, or tourism but are not concerned with their safety or social inequality.