prisons

Ear Hustle Podcast

Ear Hustle is a podcast made by Earlonne Woods, who is currently incarcerated at San Quentin State Prison, and Nigel Poor, a visual artist who works with prisoners.  A variety of topics about prison culture are covered, including the need to nurture, maintaining relationships, the effects of solitary confinement, and importance of cellmates.  Though not explicitly political or abolitionist, prisoners are humanized and some faults of the criminal justice system are highlighted.
ear hustle radiotopia
image from Radiotopia
I highly recommend listening to all episodes, but thus far there are two in particular I found useful for the classroom:
 –
This episode discusses the unwritten rules around race in prisons.  A few prisoners discuss rules around who you can take food from, what style of party prisoners have, who you shower with, and what type of tattoos you can have.
 –
This episode is about sex trafficking and restorative justice.  A survivor and a perpetrator of sex trafficking are interviewed and then have a discussion.  Obviously the episode is very emotionally charged and can be upsetting for listeners. Sara Kruzan discusses her life, how she was trafficked, terminology around sex trafficking (specifically the word ‘pimp’), and healing.
Advertisements

Americans, Guns, and Relative Deviance

I previously posted a reference to campus gun policies in relation to relative deviance and sex.  Relative deviance is when behavior is defined as deviant in a cultural context.  Restated, how we define deviance is dependent upon both when/time and where/culture.  With the recent school shooting in Florida, activists are mobilizing around changing gun laws.  Various sources are making cultural comparisons to point to the duality of Americans’ views on guns.

Transgender people’s rights:

feminist news trans guns

image from Feminist News

 

Sanitary and sexual products, in an ad campaign from EVOLVE:

images from Upworthy

 

Abortions:

abortions.jpg

image from Feminist News

 

Humanitarian crisis around disease:

video from Sunday with Lubach, a comedy news parody television show in the Netherlands.

 

Prisons:

fla today and fort myers news press image from Cagle by cartoonist Jeff Parker for Florida Today and Fort Myers News-Press

 

And with campus issues specifically, such as lab safety:

lab safety.jpg image from MadBiologist on reddit

Assata, White Nationalists, and Twitter

Last week there has been a twitter argument centered around Assata Shakur, a black feminist who was convicted of the murder of a state trooper, escaped prison, and now has political asylum in Cuba.  The Women’s March tweeted a happy birthday message to Assata on July 16th.

assata

Jake Tapper, generally liked by the moderate left, responded to the tweet.

jake

Assata Shakur is a bit of a flash point for the “alt-right.”  This tweet was seen as legitimizing arguments of white supremacists.  The Women’s March responded with a series of 20 tweets explaining who Assata is and why they support her.  COINTELPRO, or the counter intelligence program of the FBI, became a talking point and some other journalists entered the discussion.

Shaun King

The Politically Reactive podcast with W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu was in an interesting situation.  On July 13th they aired an interview with Linda Sarsour, the most well known of the Women’s March organizers, and the following week were scheduled to air an interview with Jake Tapper.  The podcasters reached out to both after the twitter argument but did not hear back.  They thought it would be inappropriate to simply air the second interview and instead made an episode “Hold Up, Wait a Minute: Twitter Feuds & Threat Models” featuring Prof. Jessie Daniels of Hunter College and CUNY College and cyber security expert Nicholas Weaver.

pol reactive.jpeg

Trends in US Corrections, 2016

The Sentencing Project is a non profit organization that collects data about prisoners and suggests policy reforms. The 2016 Trends in US Corrections data sheet has been released and can be found here.

Information includes prison population, rates of international incarceration, state expenditures, population by offense, population for drug offenses, and female, racial, and youth population in prisons.

sentencing project.jpg